New Bach for fiddlers!

Mama’s got a brand new bag yeah
She’s gonna groove it the whole night long baby

I’ve noted instrumental versatility in Bach’s day, and my own delight in playing the cello suites on violin—when some of the solo violin suites and partitas are either over-familiar or lastingly and ridiculously unplayable, unless you’re Andrew Manze or Rachel Podger. Which I’m not.

While Bach didn’t specify the solo instrument for the Benedictus of the B minor mass, it’s more often played on flute than on violin. Anyway, I’m thrilled to find a new Bach solo piece to play on violin—the exquisite flute partita, whose original function (despite the usual splendid musicological sleuthing—good old watermarks, eh!) seems unclear (like I care). Its opening Allemande [note to self: blimey, “Allemande seems to subsume a range of styles?] seems rather similar to the final movement of the A minor violin sonata, which I’ve been playing with varying degrees of ineptitude for fifty years. Whereas some pieces have a lasting association with the ideals of our teenage years, novelty can also go a long way: never mind ridding ourselves of the patina of romantic performance practice, it’s hard enough divesting myself of my own personal history of playing Bach as a teenager.

So up to now, whenever I need a preludial solo in A minor (and let’s face it, who doesn’t, sometimes?), then I love playing the opening of the second cello suite—which comes out in A minor on the fiddle. I even played it for my father’s funeral, which was virtually the only thing I ever did for him [bit late—Ed.].

Such instrumental borrowings would have been routine in Bach’s time, but I haven’t heard any fiddlers trying it out. This version on archlute eschews the usual virtuosity of flautists for an introspection more typical of the Allemande:

Yes, that’s how I like it—emboldened by the Feuchtwang variations, I’m learning it on erhu, whose timbre is also suitably other-worldly.*

*Subject to usual Terms and Conditions. Management accepts no responsibility etc. Intonation, rhythm, string-crossings not included etc.

One thought on “New Bach for fiddlers!

  1. Pingback: A brief guide to Chinese fiddles | Stephen Jones: a blog

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