Daoism—lives—language—performance. And jokes

With Li Manshan: left, 2001 (photo: Li Jin); right, Hong Kong, 2011.

For the latest, see RECENT POSTS (to the right, just below the top menu);
or scroll down through MY BLOG in the menu.
I often update old posts, as well as the pages in the top menu.
Do use the Categories and Tags in the sidebar, and the Search box;
further down in the sidebar, do relish the audio playlist (with commentary here),
and below that, a selection of photos, cued to the relevant posts.

This site began as an introduction to my work with Li Manshan, his late great father Li Qing, and the amazing household Daoists of Yanggao county in north China, notably my portrait film and the related book (see top menu). The Li family has its own category in the sidebar, with a plethora of reflections and updates (rounded up here). But the blog soon expanded into my usual crazed ramblings on a variety of more-or-less related topics.

So if Daoist ritual doesn’t float your boat, or butter your parsnips, then there are generous lashings of jokes, including Chinese jokes (some sub-heads suggested here). The drôlerie category is voluminous yet unwieldy, but the *MUST READ!* category leads to some of the wackier posts (as well as some more serious ones).

.Other pages in the top menu tend to be rather substantial, with

Compiled without regard to expense or the feelings of the public

Flann O’Brien

I seem to have discovered a taste for arcane and unlikely links between all manifestations of the Terpsichorean muse.  Here are some of the more stimulating:

Also not to be missed are

and the wacky

Another handy navigational aid is my roundup of roundups!

As you can already see, I just love doing internal links (highlighted in the text). So whether you first came here for Daoist ritual, football (indeed, Daoist football), punk, Bach, modern China, or even jokes, they’re all connected, so please explore all the links! However jocular, such connections seem necessary in these fractured insular times—building bridges, not walls.

With thanks to Michele Banal, Ian Johnson, and Morgan Davies
for dragging me into the 21st century

 from the Priory of the Azure Cloud Bottle* within the Belvedere of Tenuous Obscurity,** Chiswick
京西微玄觀內碧雲罐庵

*Azure Cloud Bottle: Bombay Sapphire—
for anyone seeking it in China, it’s 孟买蓝宝石金酒!
** Cf. the True Classic of Simplicity and Vacuity